Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

FAA issues policy for non-ADS-B aircraft

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • FAA issues policy for non-ADS-B aircraft

    https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/...m_medium=email FAA issues policy for non-ADS-B aircraft

    Rules take shape for access to 91.225 airspace

    April 2, 2019 By Mike Collins
    The FAA published a “Statement of Policy for Authorizations to Operators of Aircraft that are Not Equipped With Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out Equipment” April 1 in the Federal Register. While the policy document’s name is a mouthful, and despite the date of publication, it is no laughing matter—or April Fool’s joke. This document establishes the FAA’s policy for issuing air traffic control authorizations to pilots flying aircraft not equipped with ADS-B Out equipment who want to access ADS-B rule airspace after Jan. 1, 2020.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	ads-b.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	109.0 KB
ID:	182211

    This graphic depicts the airspace defined by 14 CFR 91.225, where ADS-B Out will be required—in addition to an altitude-encoding transponder—for flights after Jan. 1, 2020. Graphic courtesy of the FAA.

    ADS-B uses satellites instead of ground-based radar to determine aircraft location, and is a key technology behind the FAA’s Next Generation Air Traffic Control System. The FAA has mandated ADS-B Out for flights after Jan. 1, 2020, generally in airspace where a transponder is required today.


    The FAA’s policy for non-equipped aircraft, which becomes effective Jan. 2, 2020, primarily affects scheduled operators but also addresses general aviation operations.
    The FAA said that it is placing the burden for approving non-equipped aircraft operations in ADS-B rule airspace, defined by 14 CFR 91.225, primarily on the aircraft operator—and not on the FAA. “To the maximum extent possible, operators of equipped aircraft should not be penalized or have their ATC services affected by operators who choose not to equip their aircraft with ADS-B Out equipment,” the agency wrote in the policy statement. “Therefore, an ATC authorization allowing an operator to deviate from the equipage requirements of [14 CFR] 91.225 must be requested and obtained prior to the operation.”
    The ADS-B rules require that the operator of an unequipped aircraft request an authorization at least one hour prior to the flight. “The policy will preclude an operator from requesting and the FAA from issuing in-flight authorizations to operators of non-equipped aircraft. Additionally…the FAA will not accept requests for authorizations by telephone to ATC facilities. Not all requests for authorization will be granted.”
    Only if ADS-B Out equipment fails in flight will controllers be able to issue an airspace authorization to an airborne aircraft, said Rune Duke, AOPA senior director of airspace and air traffic. Other operators must request an authorization at least one hour in advance, through a website that is being developed. “We can expect the website for non-equipped authorizations to be available before 2020, likely by December,” said Duke, who regularly participates in FAA meetings.
    Duke said he expects the FAA to implement a system to track approved authorizations for non-equipped aircraft, and that the agency will monitor rule airspace and take postflight action against unauthorized aircraft. “The FAA will employ its compliance philosophy here,” he said. “Authorizations may be granted for those owners who need to get into or out of rule airspace to equip. The leniency will only last so long.” Unequipped aircraft that request a lot of airspace authorizations will probably find themselves cut off, he added. “Airspace authorizations are not a substitution for equipping in compliance with the rule.”
    And operators of scheduled flights should not expect much in the way of accommodation. “Per-operation authorizations were not intended to support routine and regular operations of non-equipped aircraft in ADS-B Out airspace,” the FAA stated. “The FAA will not issue daily or routine authorizations for scheduled operations. While ATC will consider requests from scheduled operators, it is very unlikely to issue an authorization to a scheduled operator on more than an occasional basis and is most likely to issue an authorization when a compelling or unanticipated need to deviate from the ADS-B Out equipage requirements exists.
    “ATC will make determinations as necessary to ensure equipped operators are not adversely impacted and that efficiency of operations is maintained,” the document continued. “Consistent with this principle, it will be difficult for unscheduled operators conducting operations at capacity-constrained airports to obtain authorizations. Given the complex and dynamic nature of operations within this airspace, it is unlikely that ATC will prioritize authorization requests for unequipped aircraft over providing air traffic services to aircraft equipped with ADS-B Out equipment. Unscheduled operators with a need to access this airspace on more than an occasional basis should equip with ADS-B Out to ensure no disruption to operations.
    An “unscheduled operator” is defined as any flight that does not meet 14 CFR 110.2’s definition of scheduled operations, including Part 135 commercial operations as well as GA flights conducted under Part 91.
    The FAA’s Air Traffic Organization is responsible for issuing preflight authorizations to unequipped aircraft under 14 CFR 91.225(g), while its Aviation Safety organization will be responsible for post-flight oversight of the operations. Both the issuance and denial of airspace authorization requests will be tracked by the system. Any pilot who operates a non-equipped aircraft in ADS-B airspace without obtaining a preflight authorization in accordance with 14 CFR 91.225(g)(2) will be deemed to have violated the regulations.
    AOPA is working closely with the FAA on the final policies that will govern non-equipped aircraft flying in close proximity to rule airspace. “We are making progress on ironing out the policy that will govern pilots and air traffic controllers should vectoring and other air traffic clearances require a pilot to fly into rule airspace without prior authorization,” Duke said. “It could be a safety issue, so we are working to ensure pilots and controllers do not unduly have their hands tied.”
    Last edited by astjp2; 1 week ago.
    N29787
    '41 BC12-65

  • #2
    So basically the same rules as operating an aircraft within controlled airspace without a radio.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, well try to get that written authorization, I tried at Salt Lake City and they laughed at me on the phone, so I flew anyways...
      N29787
      '41 BC12-65

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for presenting that to us

        Comment


        • #5
          So if you have a non-electric plane with a hand held radio and no transponder or ADSB you have to stay within 12 NM of the coast, out of class C, 30NM or more from any class B. and below 10,000'. Pretty much how I fly right now.

          Comment


          • #6
            14CFR91.215:
            (3) Notwithstanding paragraph (b)(2) of this section, any aircraft which was not originally certificated with an engine-driven electrical system or which has not subsequently been certified with such a system installed, balloon or glider may conduct operations in the airspace within 30 nautical miles of an airport listed in appendix D, section 1 of this part provided such operations are conducted --

            (i) Outside any Class A, Class B, or Class C airspace area; and

            (ii) Below the altitude of the ceiling of a Class B or Class C airspace area designated for an airport or 10,000 feet MSL, whichever is lower

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
              So if you have a non-electric plane with a hand held radio and no transponder or ADSB you have to stay within 12 NM of the coast, out of class C, 30NM or more from any class B. and below 10,000'. Pretty much how I fly right now.
              Actually not quite that restrictive. Unless your airplane has ever been certified with an electrical system, you can fly within the 30 NM of a class B airport, as long as you are not in class B airspace. Plus you can fly above 10,000 feet.

              Comment


              • #8
                The 30 mile part is something I just would do to avoid any problem if they got a return on me from active RADAR (not likely) and the above 10,000' part I don't do as much because it takes so danged long to get there and it is COLD up there! Might look at it differently when I take a long cross country, but for sport flying, how often does anyone WANT to be within 30 miles of a class B or over 10K'? Any of you guys do that normally (except those who actually LIVE close to a class B and have to).

                Hank

                Comment


                • #9
                  Come out west hank, I am 24 miles from SLC and I have to go over 12K to get anywhere...and be able to have some decent glide...
                  N29787
                  '41 BC12-65

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
                    The 30 mile part is something I just would do to avoid any problem if they got a return on me from active RADAR (not likely) and the above 10,000' part I don't do as much because it takes so danged long to get there and it is COLD up there! Might look at it differently when I take a long cross country, but for sport flying, how often does anyone WANT to be within 30 miles of a class B or over 10K'? Any of you guys do that normally (except those who actually LIVE close to a class B and have to).

                    Hank
                    Look up 1H0 airport. They are so close to the class B at St. Louis they had to notch the inner circle for the airport. Lots of antique airplanes fly out of there.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kansas City metro has ~32 airports of varying types inside the Class C ring and under Bravo and like 1H0 mentioned above, (3) have class B notches. I'm based at KLXT inside the ring. While I understand the limits of my Stratus2S traffic reception limits to someone else's hockey puck, the traffic awareness has become essential in this target rich envrions.

                      The frightening thing is it is often really hard to pick the visual up against a metro background. Or setting sun and summer haze, or......

                      I'm hearing a more common phrase on CTAF, "I have you on ADSB, but don't have the visual yet".

                      Even though I'm grandfathered out, I'm really, really glad to have the Stratus "in". I"ll equip fully for sure in the coming years, its a good thing once you fly with it for just 5 minutes.
                      Mark
                      1945 BC12-D
                      N39911, #6564

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hope they can get some lower cost (and POWER CONSUMPTION!) units soon. I have trouble justifying the coast of a system I can't carry a battery big enough to power. The sailplane guys seem to be working on low cost low power consumption units, but they don't seem to be ready for prime time yet.

                        Hank

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is going to be very difficult for folks in areas like DFW...
                          Ryan Short, CFI, Aerial Photographer
                          Former Taylorcraft BC-12D owner - hopefully future owner as well.
                          KRBD and KGPM - Dallas, TX
                          TexasTailwheel.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm based beneath the Memphis Class B. No big deal. No electrical system - no ADSB required.
                            Brian Cantrell
                            1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96262
                            1961 N35 Bonanza, N61GM

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
                              Hope they can get some lower cost (and POWER CONSUMPTION!) units soon. I have trouble justifying the coast of a system I can't carry a battery big enough to power. The sailplane guys seem to be working on low cost low power consumption units, but they don't seem to be ready for prime time yet.

                              Hank
                              You dont need a TSO'd unit if it the unit meets the TSO spec but has not been certified. It is a 1 sentence blurb in the faa jargon somewhere that I learned getting certified in the Uavoinx system. There are squitters that use 250 maH and are the size of a cigarette package, if you want it, you have no excuses. I run a 7ah battery, with the radio and transponder, I can go 4 hours if I leave the transponder on at those rates and still have enough volts to still transmit. Tim
                              N29787
                              '41 BC12-65

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X