Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Use of site question.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Use of site question.

    I am looking to maximize the forums assistance and my restoration of N 24323. Nickname Valentine, due to the date of manufacture/release of 2/14/1940. I have seen advice as to how best to go about using the forum, yet, I still find it a bit confusing and desire to maximize interaction and process while not clogging any of the normal thread functions. I have seen it recommended that a thread under the aircraft's "N," number is desirable, that the Registry is the place, the Blog seems it would be where such things would be done, yet I've had it mentioned that people don't read them all that much. What I'd like to do is record the process and where anyone desiring to keep up with the process can follow and/or provide inputs. And with all the various options I don't want to bury what I'd like to do or put it somewhere where it really doesn't belong. I am very interested in receiving input. But, desire to benefit others as well as receive. I don't want to be a burden. I enjoy and really appreciate the forum and its ancillary assists of links and technical resources. So, if anyone can provide inputs, or, direct me to keywords to best answer my questions, I would really appreciate that.
    Clark Freese
    1940 BL 65, Project

  • #2
    Clark, a couple thoughts, I would suggest you use the blog feature of the site as that is what it is intended for.

    No one has actually ever done this, perhaps that is why you received the earlier comment. All the past posts in the blog section appear accidental and should have been in other areas.

    Recent blog activity is highlighted on the main page just like recent forum posts. Visibility is the same.

    Alternately you could do it separate like Scott did: http://c-fclr.blogspot.com/ but then you wouldn't necessary have the same audience. Unless you post here that there is an update and direct viewer to your blog spot.

    The advantage of doing it here is that it is preserved here for the benefit of both you and the group.

    I would also suggest that if you do the blog posts you also do them in a Word or PowerPoint file at the same time. That way the "book" is available for preservation and dissemination outside a blog data format and hosting source.

    Not sure you can do chapters within a blog here but if you cannot do blog entries by aircraft section i.e. Wing/Fuselage/Power plant/Paint/etc...

    There have been blogs on other projects and sadly they are no long hosted and gone, thus the information is lost.

    The registry is not the place for a blog with feedback as you are not supposed to comment on a registry forum post.
    Mark
    1945 BC12-D
    N39911, #6564

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you, Mark. This is the sort of information I was looking for. Your comment "Recent blog activity is highlighted on the main page just like recent forum posts. Visibility is the same.," helps my understanding.
      Clark Freese
      1940 BL 65, Project

      Comment


      • #4
        HI Clark

        Thanks for sharing!
        My sense is you're not alone in having questions about "how to best use this forum," especially having recently signed on to the Facebook group, where things appear to be much more casual.

        The structure of this sight makes it far more valuable from a research and learning perspective (just my opinion) but it shouldn't discourage people from posting and participating.

        The simple answer is; post your questions, updates and experiences to the "Everyday Taylorcraft Discussion" (EDT) that way everyone will see it soonest, meaning you'll have the best chance of getting a response and we'll have the best opportunity to participate and learn.

        If the thread evolves such that it should be categorized to a specific area I'm sure one of the Moderators will take care of that. But generally the site is not jammed with traffic so EDT is fine.

        On the question of blogging; I did attempt to use the blogger on this sight and to be honest I don't recall why I found it unsuitable but I did. This may have changed with the recent software update.

        Irrespective of which tool you use to blog, posting to the ETD section with any questions and updates is good. Both for you and for the rest of the community. As you know I posted to ETD each time I updated my blog. Those that were interested followed the links, and I got questions and comments both on my blog and here. A great method of quality assurance! And I can't tell you how valuable the comments are from a motivational perspective.... sooo important when you're in the "depths" of bits and pieces that bare little resemblance to an airplane!

        So my advice..... if in doubt post, and post to ETD. Use the search function cuz there's many answers to be found that way, but post anyway just in case there's new or better information available.

        And everyone likes photos!

        Hope your project is progressing well.
        S
        Scott
        CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, Scott. "The structure of this sight makes it far more valuable from a research and learning perspective (just my opinion) but it shouldn't discourage people from posting and participating." I can see how important that is to all here. The focus on, "ETD," is one of the questions I've had, just where is the best place to post/comment on the project is helpful.

          I especially appreciate the thoughts in this paragraph, "Irrespective of which tool you use to blog, posting to the ETD section with any questions and updates is good. Both for you and for the rest of the community. As you know I posted to ETD each time I updated my blog. Those that were interested followed the links, and I got questions and comments both on my blog and here. A great method of quality assurance! And I can't tell you how valuable the comments are from a motivational perspective.... sooo important when you're in the "depths" of bits and pieces that bare little resemblance to an airplane!"

          When I first started to consider a "project" I knew I was no Island, and recognized the rich resources here. I believe that the more of these projects that are completed and recorded the better it is for Taylorcraft owners in particular in restoring an affordable alternative, but also for those wanting to own and fly on lesser budgets in/into the future. Clark
          Clark Freese
          1940 BL 65, Project

          Comment


          • #6
            Clark, you can document everything in the model section, if your is a 40/41, just put it there...
            N29787
            '41 BC12-65

            Comment


            • #7
              And the 40/41 guys DO tend to stick together and provide mutual support. There are a lot of little things that are just a bit different on the late pre war planes. Lots of guys just use the post war solutions, but doing it like they did before the war will give you a plane worth bragging about. An example is a lot of pre war planes were converted and have BC-12 panels, control wheels and doors. The pre war parts are a bit harder to build (which is why they weren't used after the war) but the original parts JUST WORK better in the pre war planes. You can "force" a post war door on a pre war but it will never have that solid THUNK of a wood door when it is closed. It is hard to describe, but we DO have most of the drawings to "do it right" if you want to. It was sure worth it on mine!

              Hank

              Comment


              • #8
                Most of the pre war planes had the fabric covered light weight doors. Only the 41 Deluxe had the heavy wooden doors that shut with a thud.

                Comment


                • #9
                  That was a question. What will get a post to the right viewers and information.

                  The doors are fabric covered with tilt out hinges for the windows. Latches and doors fit good, and latch positively. They will have to be completely restored.
                  Clark Freese
                  1940 BL 65, Project

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My 45 has the fabric covered tube doors and the 41 has the wood ones. I also have a stack of metal doors. The wood doors are probably a bit heavier, but you can't tell by picking one up. Got to admit I don't remember what the scale said. Both the wood and tube and fabric doors have the flip up windows and they are far superior to the sliders on the post war planes. (OK, that is opinion, but I have flown in both and really liked the flip up ones from the first instant I used them).

                    Hank

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was very pleased to see them and they seem to work very well. I remember feeling a bit claustrophobic with the windows on my "46," I don't remember them being able to be opened at all.
                      Clark Freese
                      1940 BL 65, Project

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X