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  • #31
    Originally posted by astjp2 View Post
    That little air pocket between the wing tank and the header can really restrict flow until gas flow gets started...happens when you drain the wing tank, refill it, creating an air gap in the line which is hard to push through the header tank. Tim
    In the case I was speaking of there was a restriction of the vent. The vent had previously worked as it was designed.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Robert Lees View Post
      I agree Tom, but from previous experience I was happy with the fuel transfer.

      This procedure only needs doing once to confirm the time from the wire gauge stopping bobbing to removal of the seat cushion from between one's buttocks ! I don't do it as normal procedure; perhaps I should have been clearer on that!
      I was gonna ask... how do you hand prop it in flight!
      Scott
      CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Scott View Post

        I was gonna ask... how do you hand prop it in flight!
        With enough altitude it will air start. My experience is that it takes 1000 feet and 125 miles per hour.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by 3Dreaming View Post

          With enough altitude it will air start. My experience is that it takes 1000 feet and 125 miles per hour.
          Tom, I agree and starting wing tank flow as soon as you can for exactly as you stated. Your above quote, wood or metal prop, (does it matter)? I know about the metal versus wood rotational and why but curious if that transfers to air-start.
          Cheers,
          Marty


          TF #596
          1946 BC-12D N95258
          Former owner of:
          1946 BC-12D/N95275
          1943 L-2B/N3113S

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          • #35
            Originally posted by M Towsley View Post

            Tom, I agree and starting wing tank flow as soon as you can for exactly as you stated. Your above quote, wood or metal prop, (does it matter)? I know about the metal versus wood rotational and why but curious if that transfers to air-start.
            I haven't tried it with a metal prop, just wood prop. I did do it with both Lycoming 65 and continental A-65, and the results were similar.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by 3Dreaming View Post

              I haven't tried it with a metal prop, just wood prop. I did do it with both Lycoming 65 and continental A-65, and the results were similar.
              My experience is the same as Tom....takes 125-130 mph to get a W72CK42 wood prop turning. I had a McCauley 1B90 metal prop on my airplane for several years and to get it to stop turning I had to slow down to almost a stall and it would start rotating at 80 mph.

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              • #37
                I leveled the plane (on the ground) with an empty tank then added 3 gallons at a time while marking the wire. Then added different colors between the marks so you could tell how much fuel you had when in flight.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Scott View Post

                  I was gonna ask... how do you hand prop it in flight!
                  Scott, I didn't need to (every time has been with a metal prop...the rotational inertia keeps the engine rotating for far longer than needed to get fuel to the carb again...particularly at cruise speed. I haven't tried it with a wood prop though!)
                  I appreciate the humour! <wink> [where are the smilies?]





                  As regards air-starting from a stationary prop, it's great fun! (Again I've only ever done it with a metal prop). The first fun is getting it to stop!

                  It takes me about 700 feet to get the engine rotating again, with a severe bunt to start with (fuel on the windscreen) but I don't turn the mags on until a lot later*. My safety "floor" is 1000 AGL. If not started by then I'm landing dead stick, and what happens is I land longer than I need to...therefore much side-slipping is required, even in the flare, to lose the last bit of height/speed, but I guess that's a fault on the right side!

                  Rob

                  *Further reasoning/details available if requested.

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                  • #39
                    I don't have the constitution to turn off my one and only fan, even if it has an electric starter.

                    There are a couple of things I remember about my dead stick Taylorcraft adventure however... First, how quickly the prop stopped, and second how much less glide distance/time you have compared to a simulated engine failure (i.e. engine idling).

                    Thanks to both of you for for doing the "research" though. Good to know that, if you've resolved the engine fault, a restart may be possible. Only decision left to make is, do you want to use up your altitude trying to restart, or getting to a landing area!
                    Scott
                    CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

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                    • #40
                      I have only done it over the airport with plenty of altitude. It was my first attempt at soaring. I glided for quite a while, but was never quite able to maintain altitude. I think I could pick better conditions now. I lowered the nose for restart at 2000 AGL with plans to stop at 1000 AGL and set up for landing if it didn't restart. Like Rob I had planned my approach to be plenty high with a slip to get down, but it didn't come to that.

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                      • #41
                        If it helps at all my Taylorcraft at idle flew just like a Schweitzer 2-22. The 2-22 is NOT a sailplane, it is a training glider and has a stick instead o a wheel but if you want some confidence building for a potential engine failure look for a local gliding club with a 2-22. You want a 2-22, NOT a 2-33 or other more efficient plane! I was able to soar in the 2-22 in good conditions (not great, but good) and think I could probably soar the 41 Taylorcraft if needed.........but I don't plan to test that out anytime soon.

                        Hank

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
                          If it helps at all my Taylorcraft at idle flew just like a Schweitzer 2-22. The 2-22 is NOT a sailplane, it is a training glider and has a stick instead o a wheel but if you want some confidence building for a potential engine failure look for a local gliding club with a 2-22. You want a 2-22, NOT a 2-33 or other more efficient plane! I was able to soar in the 2-22 in good conditions (not great, but good) and think I could probably soar the 41 Taylorcraft if needed.........but I don't plan to test that out anytime soon.

                          Hank
                          I'm waiting on a day with ideal conditions before I try again.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
                            If it helps at all my Taylorcraft at idle flew just like a Schweitzer 2-22.
                            Hank
                            I've got to disagree with this. I've flown a 2-22 quite a bit and have been flying Taylorcrafts for over 50 years. Yes on a good day you can soar in a Taylorcraft but the 2-22 will do much much better. The glide ratio of a 2-22 is 18:1 vs the Taylorcraft's 10:1, gross wt of a 2-22 is 900 lbs vs Taylorcraft's 1100-1500 depending on model.

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                            • #44
                              a prop that is stopped is a big wind break, windmilling reduces the drag quite a bit...
                              N29787
                              '41 BC12-65

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by astjp2 View Post
                                a prop that is stopped is a big wind break, windmilling reduces the drag quite a bit...
                                I am going to have ti disagree with you on that.

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