Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Beautiful 2007 Taylorsport LSA for sale in Texas! She's still like new! www.taylorcraft.com to see build photos. 0-200D engine. Everything in beautiful condition! Just finishing detailing after annual! Will deliver anywhere in the USA!

    Feel free to contact me! 281-786-9444 or email me at jimmybcox@gmail.com
    Attached Files

  • PA1195
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Maybe a offshore sale is in order? Don't know about Canadian regs (checked: Takes standard Airworthiness Certificate to fly through) but maybe EU would allow it to be imported and flown. Then there's ASEAN money and of course China imports TCDS like CC18 for production.

    I'd trade him >< as he offered to deliver. Get Tim to do a conformity and go fly.

    Gary
    Last edited by PA1195; 07-02-2016, 22:58.

    Leave a comment:


  • M Towsley
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Probably not. I think he just posted it and left, hoping for the best. I sent him an e-mail the last time this conversation came up and never received a response. I am sure he is hoping for someone who doesn't have a clue about the plane or paperwork.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA1195
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Think you'll ever get a straight up answer about this bird?

    Gary

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank Jarrett
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    They do ramp checks here! I got one, and believe it or not it was kind of fun.

    It was kind of quiet in Richmond and the manager threw his FISDO guys out and told them to go to some of the small airports and LEARN something about small planes (they spend almost all their time with airliners). I was under instruction with my instructor at the time eating lunch when the two of them came in and asked who owned the Orange plane on the ramp. I jumped up and said it was mine (with my instructor trying to look like he didn't hear them). They asked if they could take a look at it and I left my lunch all excited to show my plane to them.

    We spent quite some time going all over her while I showed them it really was covered with fabric (NOT paper!) and was made of "pipe" and aluminum with some wood and really didn't have an electrical system or starter.

    Towards the end they asked if I understood that this was a Ramp Check and I said "sure, why?" They said "What if we found something wrong?" I answered that "If you found a problem, I would say we no longer had an intent for flight and I would ground the plane until we had my A&P fix it. You can't cite me if there is no intent for flight."

    The looks on their faces was really funny. That's when they found out I wasn't just a student with an old plane but was the manager of the NASA GA Program. I think I knew the regs on GA better than they did.

    We also all agreed that a Ramp Check SHOULD NOT be a traumatic experience! It should be a LEARNING experience for everyone. They learned about REALLY OLD airplanes and I learned you can have a lot of fun with guys from the FAA. My instructor learned you can have fun with almost any experience (but I think he got indigestion while I was out there).

    I looked FORWARD to them looking my plane over. They could have found something that could have saved our lives! They didn't, but they COULD HAVE.

    Kind of nice to know we all have at least two mire guys at teh FAA who have a positive attitude about our old planes.

    Hank
    Last edited by Robert Lees; 07-02-2016, 14:39. Reason: Paragraph spacing...it makes it easier to read

    Leave a comment:


  • swoeric
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Can I like this comment



    Originally posted by astjp2 View Post
    Buy and fly...who would know the difference? its not like there are may FAA inspectors who ramp check anymore. Or strip it for parts....or new data plate....

    Leave a comment:


  • astjp2
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Buy and fly...who would know the difference? its not like there are may FAA inspectors who ramp check anymore. Or strip it for parts....or new data plate....

    Leave a comment:


  • 3Dreaming
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    We are not so lucky with our aircraft here in the USA. If it truly does have an airworthiness certificate like is stated on the FAA registry, then here in the states the airplane is basically useless. I don't think it would be eligible for anything other than an experimental airworthiness certificate, in a obscurer sub category, with restrictive operating limitations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Lees
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    In the UK we operate all our Taylorcraft in the equivalent of the US Experimental category (the details are different, but similar to the Canadian Owner Maintainance category. I'm sure I'll be corrected upon the Canadian terms).

    My point is that I should see no reason that a Taylorcraft built to EXP standards (if that is the case with the subject machine) should not be a highly desirable aircraft to own and operate. Surely it performs, but with cheaper maintenance costs?

    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • NC36061
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
    I see the engine came from GANN Aviation. What is an "AMA EXPR" engine? Also the FAA registry says the plane is a "Special Flight Permit" aircraft and was built for "Production Flight Testing". Has the FAA released this plane for operation with a normal airworthiness certificate?

    BEAUTIFUL plane, but can it be used like a normal production Taylorcraft or is it restricted in any way?

    Hank
    Amateur/Experimental engine category, either a mistake made when it was registered, or the non-certified O-200 that Continental had available for a while for experimental builders. Seems the consensus last time this was up for sale was likely a hopeless paperwork nightmare... Maybe someone like Terry could help get it into standard category, but a lot of research and due diligence required of anyone interested. Not a bad price for an almost-new airplane if the paperwork could be worked out.
    Last edited by NC36061; 06-28-2016, 00:45.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank Jarrett
    replied
    Re: Last taylorcraft ever built, 2007 slsa, 92hr total time snew, 55,000

    I see the engine came from GANN Aviation. What is an "AMA EXPR" engine? Also the FAA registry says the plane is a "Special Flight Permit" aircraft and was built for "Production Flight Testing". Has the FAA released this plane for operation with a normal airworthiness certificate?

    BEAUTIFUL plane, but can it be used like a normal production Taylorcraft or is it restricted in any way?

    Hank

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X