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Taylorcraft BC12D overal parts availability

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  • Taylorcraft BC12D overal parts availability

    Greetings.
    Sorry if this is covered somewhere. I searched for a couple hours and couldn't find anything about "General Parts Availability".
    Here is my situation:
    I took my wife to look at a C-210.
    After climbing in and on and around it, she says "It's nice. What's that over there?"
    That over there is a 1947 Taylorcraft BC12D.
    She doesn't care that it's older, slower, carries less load, a lot more cramped inside, and a pain to get in and out. It's "cute".
    She also knows that we don't need to go far and fast. We don't need to carry a bunch of people. It's never going to be more than the two of us, and if we need to go far she wants to go slow enough and low enough to be nosy. (Personally, I'm the same way.)
    I love 1940s taildraggers. Essentially it's all I've been flying for the last 4(ish) years. And very occasionally a (borrowed) C-182, C-172, C-150 just to keep current.
    My problem is I'm too old for a project. I want something I can get in and fly, and not spend all my time fiddling and fixing.
    I don't want something that's going to turn into a hanger queen because I can't get parts or age is a factor.
    It's 85hp, no electrical system, very low time engine, new covering in 2013 and always hangered.
    What's the general parts availability?
    Is the plane going to require constant tweaking?
    I average a little over 100 hrs a year.

    The last BC12D I flew was in 1966 and it was on floats. Too long ago to be useful knowledge.

    Thanks folks

    Oh, bye the way, I am totally smitten with this airplane, so smite me a might blow upside the head with some reality.

  • #2
    Factory support, non-existent. Mechanics who know how to keep her up, rare as hens teeth, Now, don't let that worry you. The plane is DIRT SIMPLE and honestly a real pleasure to work on (for me at least). The Taylorcraft has a soul and is reliable because of it's simplicity. It is a pure joy to fly and you FLY it, you don't operate it. If you can do basic maintenance on a pre-computer car you can keep a Taylorcraft flying safely. You WILL need to find an understanding A&P/IA who can provide the legal signatures for things like the annual. This site can help you find those kind of people. Treat them well. They are getting rare and will become good friends. My mechanics understand I am a Taylorcraft nut and know I can get them any tech data on how things should go together. We are a team and work together (which usually results in annuals that cost less than any of my friends). I do 90% of the work which is really fun and he comes in and inspects everything, then I put it all back together and he check-flights her and does the paperwork. Parts? Well, many of us make them. The average airplane owners home garage has more (and mostly better) tools than the factory had. A local machine shop that does hot rod work will probably have access to machine tools if you ever need them (which few of us seem to). There isn't a problem with a Taylorcraft that this group hasn't seen and solved or a part we couldn't find or make. Welcome to the community! Your statements tell me you are already one of us. Welcome to the lunatic asylum! We are about the happiest crazy people around.

    Oh yea, you will need to get a hand held radio and maybe a tablet or hand held GPS. You DO NOT want to put an engine driven electrical system in her. The transponder is a power hog and all those electronics take the fun out of REAL flying. There is a funny joy to flying a cross country (for us that is usually under 200 miles) and smelling fresh cut hay and cow manure. Also don't forget to wave and rock your wings to the train engineers and truckers passing you!

    Hank

    Comment


    • #3
      Best go fly one with a passenger or instructor for a few hours. Let the memory settle in, then go back and repeat. Have a mechanic do a pre-purchase inspection of the plane and the records. You know all this but still do it before love or dislikes take over. It should be a family decision.

      Others are supported better by mechanics and parts suppliers. But if you have a climate and place to maintain them they do ok. They are priced low and it's a buyer's market.

      Edit: Have a look here and then search for other makes: https://www.barnstormers.com/cat_search.php

      Gary
      Last edited by PA1195; 3 weeks ago.
      N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the responses.
        I'm handy with a variety of tools, having built houses, cars, and helped with a few planes.
        Since I've been flying 1940s taildraggers, I have acquired handheld radios, Avare, Metam and assorted other aviation apps on my phone and tablet, and other required bits and pieces needed to fly or walk home, depending on the airplane.
        All I need is a checkup from the neck up.

        Shep

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        • #5
          For the power vs airspeed they and Luscombe do well...but of course so do the Cessna 120/140's. It's the little piddily things and parts that makes unsupported planes a challenge. Old stuff gets fixed until it wears out. Then repairs, replacements, overhauls, and new (like engines and recover) can exceed the value of the entire aircraft. They are and will be only worth so much regardless of condition, but if you find them fun then that's what counts. I've had nine planes and flew many others with a wheel on the rear. The Taylorcraft is in the middle of choices....some are better and the rest are worse for my needs in Alaska. I've owned two, both 1941's, and the current one is my last.

          Gary
          N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

          Comment


          • #6
            Per Shep's basic question "Taylorcraft BC12D overal parts availability" have a look at Wag-Aero (https://www.wagaero.com/model-specif...aft-parts.html) and UNIVAIR (https://www.univair.com/categories/taylorcraft.html) for starters. Obviously other components like for tires, engine parts, fabric, airframe components (https://www.airframesalaska.com/Tayl...uts-s/1859.htm and https://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus...ylorcraft.html) and others are available from various vendors and manufacturers.

            Main landing gear components wear over time and are expensive so any owner would do well to remove and inspect them frequently for corrosion and stress.

            Check the various Service Bulletins (http://dc65stc.blogspot.com/search/l...Factory%20Data) and AD's (https://www.taylorcraft.org/resources.html) for compliance and current condition. Again, having to replace or repair can exceed the base value of the airframe, engine, or propeller.

            Gary
            Last edited by PA1195; 3 weeks ago.
            N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

            Comment


            • #7
              Where are you located? If the work was quality on the recover, they can be nice, I am working on Peter's "amateur restoration" he bought, needless to say, new aileron spars and some welding to get rid of the corrosion on the tail feathers. 85hp is almost enough depending on your elevation, I have a field elevation of 4500', density is almost 10000 in the summer. Send some pics, or it just didnt happen. Good luck, Tim
              N29787
              '41 BC12-65

              Comment


              • #8
                Pretty much everything could be had if you throw enough money at it. I really can't think of very many items that are impossible to find. (except F-21 FWF parts)

                Comment


                • #9
                  If I were considering owning a Taylorcraft I'd first review the resources available free here (https://www.taylorcraft.org/resources.html) or for sale here (https://www.eflightmanuals.com/ITEM_...1&cID=3249).

                  Then >>>source and seek the advice of an A&P/IA familiar with the airplane<<< regarding its current airworthiness or future need for compliance. These aren't Pipers or Cessna's that populate almost every airport and are typically available for training purposes at A&P schools.

                  Gary
                  N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    check the wing spars. they are wood and some people over tighten the bolts and drive the washers into the wood. also some spars are laminated check that they are not coming apart.. I did not do this and if I had to pay to repair the wings I could buy at least 2 Taylorcrafts in good flying condition for what it would cost to repair the wings.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The cost Bernard is giving is if you HAVE the wings rebuilt. It is almost all labor except for the cost of the spars themselves and recovering. If it happens (which you should have been able to catch on a pre-buy) and you DO have to rebuild a wing it is something almost anyone can do or learn. You WILL need to get your work checked by an FAA mechanic prior to covering but if you like to work on your own plane (which you should if you want one that is 75 years old) you have to look at your labor as free. Then the cash outlay is MUCH less.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Oh, bye the way, I am totally smitten with this airplane, so smite me a might blow upside the head with some reality.
                        You don't choose the plane, the plane chooses you ... They'll tell you not to let that happen, but it does.
                        I really don't think you will have a problem finding parts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the tips. Had a chance to read the logs and crawl around the plane.
                          I couldn't fly it, the engine guy turned up early and started the annual 10 minutes before I got there.
                          I've downloaded all the documents I can get my hands on, have been reading until my eyes bleed.
                          The first thing that will need to be "adjusted" is the seat.
                          I'm 4 inches taller and 20 lbs heavier than the current owner.
                          At some point someone put in a single piece sling under the single piece seat pad.
                          I'll need to lower the seat on my side or learn to live without skin on my shins.
                          I also need to figure out why there is an opening in the bottom of the fuselage that runs side to side under the seat. I can stick my fingers though the opening,
                          The plane was covered to leave this opening. since I fly year round, I'm concerned my backside will freeze in the breeze.
                          When I asked the current owner he just shrugged his shoulders.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            How about taking some pics of the plane and underseat opening from above and below that illustrate the question? My plane has fabric under that area with small openings just for the bungees, but Taylorcraft built a framed box that the fabric covered upper landing gear "V's" nestle into. Maybe your main gear is extended some and there's now a temporary opening in that box? Just a guess and trying to be helpful.

                            Gary
                            N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Shepherd View Post
                              Thanks for all the tips. Had a chance to read the logs and crawl around the plane.
                              I couldn't fly it, the engine guy turned up early and started the annual 10 minutes before I got there.
                              I've downloaded all the documents I can get my hands on, have been reading until my eyes bleed.
                              The first thing that will need to be "adjusted" is the seat.
                              I'm 4 inches taller and 20 lbs heavier than the current owner.
                              At some point someone put in a single piece sling under the single piece seat pad.
                              I'll need to lower the seat on my side or learn to live without skin on my shins.
                              I also need to figure out why there is an opening in the bottom of the fuselage that runs side to side under the seat. I can stick my fingers though the opening,
                              The plane was covered to leave this opening. since I fly year round, I'm concerned my backside will freeze in the breeze.
                              When I asked the current owner he just shrugged his shoulders.
                              Both are normal, that sling is factory, so is the opening...
                              N29787
                              '41 BC12-65

                              Comment

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