Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

N5248M finally found

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Green might indicate Randolph dope upon Ceconite fabric (which is later than cotton...do the log books not show any work carried out after 1970 at all?)

    Ceconite (or any Dacron fabric) usually has a black PMA stamp every so often on the fabric, Cotton or Linen does not. See attached example.

    Regarding your N number: Don't use a heat gun until you try a hair dryer first (to soften the adhesive).

    Hope that helps,
    Rob
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: N5248M finally found

      There are no markings anywhere on the back of the fabric. The logbooks are being mailed to me so I haven't had a chance to look through them yet. I only have the logbook that my grandfather had in 1953. I don't know a ton about fabric airplanes so I will have someone smarter than me look at it and determine the condition of the fabric. I do know it has a tear under the front of the fuselage and a small puncture in the top above the cockpit that looks very minor.
      Patrick James
      1947 BC12D N5248M
      Muncie, Indiaa

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: N5248M finally found

        A picture from 53-54 in Farmland Indiana.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	1954 BC12D.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	139.3 KB
ID:	156897
        Patrick James
        1947 BC12D N5248M
        Muncie, Indiaa

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: N5248M finally found

          Originally posted by patricktjms View Post
          I've been told it was cotton but I don't know for sure. The 337 from 1970 says cotton. It's green on the back if that matters. And yes, the mailbox numbers on the tail have to go. How does one remove them from the fabric? I assume a heat gun is not an option?
          Hey Patrick,
          I want to add my welcome aboard. I have a '41 DeLuxe based at Pam's near Eminence. I live in Mooresville 11 sm SW of the Indianapolis International Airport. It is good to have another T in the area. If I can help with anything or have any questions, let me know. I have owned my T for 46 years and rebuilt/restored it 3 times (long story). I also have a '40 T in the garage-hangar-attic that I am presently restoring.
          Mike Girdley A&P/IA
          NC29804
          NC27451
          mike.girdley@att.net
          Last edited by mikeg; 03-03-2016, 19:31.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: N5248M finally found

            How does one remove them from the fabric? I assume a heat gun is not an option?[/QUOTE]

            The product "Goof Off" will probably remove the numbers without harming the finish. Also, WD-40 will usually lift adhesives.
            Best Regards,
            Mark Julicher

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: N5248M finally found

              3M makes two adhesive removers that are not supposed to harm cured auto paints and fabrics. But I have no idea if they will harm aviation fabric systems or paint. You can get them at better auto parts stores or industrial suppliers. PN 08984 or 08987. I'm not associated with 3M in any way.

              I would test any product on a spot that doesn't matter so much before using it on your vertical fin, like the inside bottom of the gear or an inspection hole that isn't cut out yet.

              Mark
              Mark
              1945 BC12-D
              N39911, #6564

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: N5248M finally found

                Try Naptha, (lighter fluid). Usually doesn't harm much of anything yet softens and removes adhesive.
                Cheers,
                Marty


                TF #596
                1946 BC-12D N95258
                Former owner of:
                1946 BC-12D/N95275
                1943 L-2B/N3113S

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: N5248M finally found

                  Hi Patrick,

                  If in fact your airplane is covered with 46 year old cotton, removing the registration number stickers is irrelevant IMHO. Cotton, being organic material, has a finite useful life. When new, it was a given that these airplanes would be recovered routinely, allowing for frequent inspection of the complete airframe. With the advent of synthetic fabrics, recovers have become far more infrequent, which of course means things under the fabric aren't being seen nearly as often. Unless you find something that says your airplane was recovered more recently than 1970, I would have to believe you are going to be recovering it. Even if covered with a synthetic fabric that tested OK, I would be wanting to take off all the fabric so I could look at everything if I thought it was possibly 46 years since it was last recovered.

                  Just my 2, good luck and great you were able to get it back!

                  Dave
                  NC36061 '41 BC12-65 "Deluxe" S/N 3028
                  NC39244 '45 BC12-D S/N 6498

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: N5248M finally found

                    Originally posted by Robert Lees View Post
                    Green might indicate Randolph dope upon Ceconite fabric (which is later than cotton...do the log books not show any work carried out after 1970 at all?)

                    Ceconite (or any Dacron fabric) usually has a black PMA stamp every so often on the fabric, Cotton or Linen does not. See attached example.

                    Regarding your N number: Don't use a heat gun until you try a hair dryer first (to soften the adhesive).

                    Hope that helps,
                    Rob
                    Homebuilders use a Dacron fabric available from Aircraft Spruce that is not certified. It does not have any markings.
                    Ray

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: N5248M finally found

                      You are right, Ray, but I'm sure that fabric is an "uncertified light" fabric that is intended for ultralights etc. I do know some Taylorcraft so covered, but in the USA for a certified aircraft, would be illegal.

                      There is a French Dacron fabric of equivalent strength to Ceconite 102 or Poly-Fiber "Medium-2" called Diatex which has no stamp. But I doubt you would find it in the USA.

                      Rob

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X