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N5248M finally found

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  • Robert Lees
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    You are right, Ray, but I'm sure that fabric is an "uncertified light" fabric that is intended for ultralights etc. I do know some Taylorcraft so covered, but in the USA for a certified aircraft, would be illegal.

    There is a French Dacron fabric of equivalent strength to Ceconite 102 or Poly-Fiber "Medium-2" called Diatex which has no stamp. But I doubt you would find it in the USA.

    Rob

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  • Ray36048
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Originally posted by Robert Lees View Post
    Green might indicate Randolph dope upon Ceconite fabric (which is later than cotton...do the log books not show any work carried out after 1970 at all?)

    Ceconite (or any Dacron fabric) usually has a black PMA stamp every so often on the fabric, Cotton or Linen does not. See attached example.

    Regarding your N number: Don't use a heat gun until you try a hair dryer first (to soften the adhesive).

    Hope that helps,
    Rob
    Homebuilders use a Dacron fabric available from Aircraft Spruce that is not certified. It does not have any markings.

    Leave a comment:


  • NC36061
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Hi Patrick,

    If in fact your airplane is covered with 46 year old cotton, removing the registration number stickers is irrelevant IMHO. Cotton, being organic material, has a finite useful life. When new, it was a given that these airplanes would be recovered routinely, allowing for frequent inspection of the complete airframe. With the advent of synthetic fabrics, recovers have become far more infrequent, which of course means things under the fabric aren't being seen nearly as often. Unless you find something that says your airplane was recovered more recently than 1970, I would have to believe you are going to be recovering it. Even if covered with a synthetic fabric that tested OK, I would be wanting to take off all the fabric so I could look at everything if I thought it was possibly 46 years since it was last recovered.

    Just my 2, good luck and great you were able to get it back!

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • M Towsley
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Try Naptha, (lighter fluid). Usually doesn't harm much of anything yet softens and removes adhesive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Bowden
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    3M makes two adhesive removers that are not supposed to harm cured auto paints and fabrics. But I have no idea if they will harm aviation fabric systems or paint. You can get them at better auto parts stores or industrial suppliers. PN 08984 or 08987. I'm not associated with 3M in any way.

    I would test any product on a spot that doesn't matter so much before using it on your vertical fin, like the inside bottom of the gear or an inspection hole that isn't cut out yet.

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Julicher
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    How does one remove them from the fabric? I assume a heat gun is not an option?[/QUOTE]

    The product "Goof Off" will probably remove the numbers without harming the finish. Also, WD-40 will usually lift adhesives.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikeg
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Originally posted by patricktjms View Post
    I've been told it was cotton but I don't know for sure. The 337 from 1970 says cotton. It's green on the back if that matters. And yes, the mailbox numbers on the tail have to go. How does one remove them from the fabric? I assume a heat gun is not an option?
    Hey Patrick,
    I want to add my welcome aboard. I have a '41 DeLuxe based at Pam's near Eminence. I live in Mooresville 11 sm SW of the Indianapolis International Airport. It is good to have another T in the area. If I can help with anything or have any questions, let me know. I have owned my T for 46 years and rebuilt/restored it 3 times (long story). I also have a '40 T in the garage-hangar-attic that I am presently restoring.
    Mike Girdley A&P/IA
    NC29804
    NC27451
    mike.girdley@att.net
    Last edited by mikeg; 03-03-2016, 20:31.

    Leave a comment:


  • patricktjms
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    A picture from 53-54 in Farmland Indiana.

    Click image for larger version

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  • patricktjms
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    There are no markings anywhere on the back of the fabric. The logbooks are being mailed to me so I haven't had a chance to look through them yet. I only have the logbook that my grandfather had in 1953. I don't know a ton about fabric airplanes so I will have someone smarter than me look at it and determine the condition of the fabric. I do know it has a tear under the front of the fuselage and a small puncture in the top above the cockpit that looks very minor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Lees
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Green might indicate Randolph dope upon Ceconite fabric (which is later than cotton...do the log books not show any work carried out after 1970 at all?)

    Ceconite (or any Dacron fabric) usually has a black PMA stamp every so often on the fabric, Cotton or Linen does not. See attached example.

    Regarding your N number: Don't use a heat gun until you try a hair dryer first (to soften the adhesive).

    Hope that helps,
    Rob
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • patricktjms
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    I've been told it was cotton but I don't know for sure. The 337 from 1970 says cotton. It's green on the back if that matters. And yes, the mailbox numbers on the tail have to go. How does one remove them from the fabric? I assume a heat gun is not an option?

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Lees
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Well Patrick it looks remarkably good (apart from the stuck-on N number )

    Any indication as to the fabric type / condition? I think you thought it was cotton or linen?

    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • patricktjms
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Here's a picture of it after getting it home and blowing all of the dust off of it.

    Click image for larger version

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  • PA1195
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    Congratulations on the closure and finding the Taylorcraft. I went through a similar process in the 1980's. I had pictures of a Piper J-3 and PA-12 my father flew commercially in Harbor Springs, Mi. He passed when I was almost 3, and nothing remained but a few photos of the family with the planes. I found the J-3 had later crashed in Mexico, and the PA-12 went to Canada. Its last owner at that time flew it often and didn't want to part with it, so I was glad to find it had a good life and was well loved and cared for.

    My Avatar is a picture of my Taylorcraft N36007 and an owner in the 1960's (I'm #33 on that list). His son (who said his dad loved the plane) sent it to the previous owner who passed it on to me at sale. It's here out of respect for their family.

    Gary

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  • patricktjms
    replied
    Re: N5248M finally found

    The brief version is,....About 3 years ago I started asking old farmers if they remember it and some had some pictures but none had clear pictures of the N number. After searching off and on for a few years, my dad found a log book in an old box of black and white pictures which gave me the N number and enabled me to search through the FAA. It was registered to a deceased person, his son was deceased, his 1st wife deceased, and couldn't find the second wife. Finally I started finding obituaries and calling people listed as surviving relatives "close friends". One finally called me back and had a name for me which ended up being what I needed to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

    Interestingly enough, in the log book of my grandfather's, Tom Reese is the one who instructed him and signed him off for his license in 1953. I took lessons from his son Steve Reese in 1995. Small world.

    I never finished my training because I was 17 and broke and stupid, but I intend on getting the Tailorcraft airworthy and begging and bribing Steve to instruct me through the remainder of my training with it.

    Leave a comment:

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