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Fixing loose aileron brackets

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  • Fixing loose aileron brackets

    In preflighting Traci T-Craft, it seems, over time, that her right wing outboard aileron cast bracket is showing signs of loosening on the spar. I suspect it is from spar compression under the fitting or more likely under the washer and nut on the front side of the aft wing spar. At what point should I consider it big enough of a problem that I should fix it, and how is that done without major surgery to the wing?

    I have reviewed prior related discussions here, most of which were about the small aileron hinge brackets, but does anyone have anything to add about the aft spar cast brackets and their tightness?

    Also, when I am building new aileron spars on my projects is there something that could/should be done to prevent spar crushing on these aft spar aileron brackets and on the brackets on the ailerons themselves.

    I think I remember someone using an aluminium doubler behind the nuts to prevent future spar crushing issues? Should the nuts be torqued to a low ft-pound (newton-meters) setting, or is that just too anal?

    Jon
    "Captain Jon" Timlin
    '46 BC12-D N94952 Traci T-Craft
    '46 BC12-D N96301 Tami T-Craft (undergoing restoration)
    '51 Model 19 N6629N Terri T-Craft (undergoing restoration)

  • #2
    you won't stop the looseness over time. Wood is always alive in that it will take on moisture or lose it depending on climate change. You should have an inspection cover somewhere in the vicinity on the front side of the spar. I would look to see if you have enough room to go through the bracket slot where it passes thru the trailing edge with a long extension. If not, you could add an inspection ring to the top of the wing for access.

    Comment


    • #3
      Jon. you may be remembering that I used 0.080 aluminium plates in support of the aileron brackets instead of the silly penny washers.



      You should have my cd somewhere. If not, there is a whole host of info on my site www.taylorcraft.org.uk

      But remember in the UK we are not bound by FAA regs for Taylorcraft.

      Rob

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Rob. I didn't want to identify you on this matter (never know who lurks here), but since you are in a different situation, thanks for your answer.......

        It makes sense to increase the surface area where pressure is applied with the nuts, by adding an aluminium plate as a backer. But, as you alluded to, we must comply with FAA rules in our restorations, unless we can get the blessing of someone like a DER perhaps. I need to talk to Terry....... just too much going on over the holiday season....

        Jon
        "Captain Jon" Timlin
        '46 BC12-D N94952 Traci T-Craft
        '46 BC12-D N96301 Tami T-Craft (undergoing restoration)
        '51 Model 19 N6629N Terri T-Craft (undergoing restoration)

        Comment


        • #5
          Good ol' West System epoxy coating the whole spar will help with sealing as well as strength. The Gougeon Book on Boats is a great resource. You'll still need to use the approved glue for the construction, but use the epoxy to seal and strengthen.
          https://www.westsystem.com/wp-conten...k-061205-1.pdf
          John
          I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

          Comment


          • #6
            When was your last recover? When do you expect to recover? That would help decide to tighten and how much?
            N29787
            '41 BC12-65

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            • #7
              Last recover was in '98 and I don't anticipate recovering soon........ It's all still looking good.............

              Jon
              "Captain Jon" Timlin
              '46 BC12-D N94952 Traci T-Craft
              '46 BC12-D N96301 Tami T-Craft (undergoing restoration)
              '51 Model 19 N6629N Terri T-Craft (undergoing restoration)

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah, just snug the bolts up then, but please do not torque them to any spec in a book or you will crush the spar. Another inexperienced taylorcrafter has to buy new spars when they did. Tim
                N29787
                '41 BC12-65

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks, Tim. I will remember that.

                  I checked the fittings on my project planes and came up with some interesting stuff. Only one outboard bracket was slightly loose, but one wing had 3 part # 1212's, the center aileron bracket, installed. Did the previous restorer run out of parts? And was it a legal substitution?

                  Jon Click image for larger version

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                  "Captain Jon" Timlin
                  '46 BC12-D N94952 Traci T-Craft
                  '46 BC12-D N96301 Tami T-Craft (undergoing restoration)
                  '51 Model 19 N6629N Terri T-Craft (undergoing restoration)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Jon,
                    The 1212 is 1/16" shorter than the others due to the fact that it sits on a plywood doubler. Did they shim it out ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One of the smartest things C.G. Taylor did was to sell his design to Britain.
                      Seems it was a win-win that has lasted. The FAA has to take note eventually.
                      (Our C.A.P. squadron recovered a lot when I was a cadet. Bodies mostly.)

                      John: will that West system work on cork fuel floats? (Or should I fix it if it isn't broke?)

                      (...Last annual I had all remaining inspection holes cut and plates installed. What you don't know can and one day will hurt you. Don't ask.)
                      Last edited by wmfife; 1 day ago.
                      Bill Fife
                      BL12-65 '41 Deluxe Under (s-l-o-w) Restoration

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wmfife View Post
                        One of the smartest things C.G. Taylor did was to sell his design to Britain.
                        Seems it was a win-win that has lasted. The FAA has to take note eventually.
                        (Our C.A.P. squadron recovered a lot when I was a cadet. Bodies mostly.)

                        John: will that West system work on cork fuel floats? (Or should I fix it if it isn't broke?)

                        (...Last annual I had all remaining inspection holes cut and plates installed. What you don't know can and one day will hurt you. Don't ask.)
                        Buy a univair j3 fuel cap, no more sinking cork floats
                        N29787
                        '41 BC12-65

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          John: will that West system work on cork fuel floats? (Or should I fix it if it isn't broke?)
                          I wouldn't use the West system or other epoxy system. Anybody else use an epoxy to seal the float?

                          One of the smartest things C.G. Taylor did was to sell his design to Britain.
                          Ask Rob what he thinks of the Auster, the British Taylorcraft. There are several at his field and I have flown in one of them.........

                          "Captain Jon" Timlin
                          '46 BC12-D N94952 Traci T-Craft
                          '46 BC12-D N96301 Tami T-Craft (undergoing restoration)
                          '51 Model 19 N6629N Terri T-Craft (undergoing restoration)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'd do some testing before I'd use West System with fuel. It'll depend on what fuel you run too....some of the cargas has crap in there that NOTHING will stand up to.
                            John
                            I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm of an open mind when it comes to sealing cork floats.

                              Any two-pack epoxy varnish, when cured, forms an inpenetrable coating that should not be affected by fuels; even aromatic ones.

                              The cork float I have on my UK Taylorcraft G-BREY is still the original one since import in the late eighties. It doesn't sink; but we use avgas mostly, rather than autofuel. 3000 flying hours since, and a whole lot more parked in the hangar for 31 years.

                              Rob

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