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Windshield Paint removal

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  • Windshield Paint removal

    Just before the aircraft restoration I have acquired, went into storage it was repainted and was in process of being reassembled when damaged in a large thunderstorm. The windshield has some paint over spray on it. I am looking for ideas on how to remove the "over spray" while protecting the windshield. It is in good condition, no crazing, scratches or cracks and still flexible. So I am interested in preserving it. It's for a 1940 BL 65 with a "blown" windshield.
    Clark Freese
    1940 BL 65, Project

  • #2
    automotive paint polishing compound

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    • #3
      I have used lacquer thinner.

      If you try it do it on a test spot first.

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      • #4
        Stitts C-2210 is what I have used with great success.

        Sully

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        • #5
          Not sure what paint is on there but I have had luck with Naptha, (lighter fluid). I have never had it attack any plastics, but check a small area.

          Use good quality microfiber towels, not Harbor Freight, etc. Good luck!
          Cheers,
          Marty


          TF #596
          1946 BC-12D N95258
          Former owner of:
          1946 BC-12D/N95275
          1943 L-2B/N3113S

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          • #6
            I recall the lacquer thinner has a number of things in it like methyl, acetone, toluene, ketone or MEK. So it appears to me to be a potpourri of harmful liquids.

            Not sure which ones are the effective ones, maybe all, perhaps any single one of them would work.

            I have a can of VM&P Naptha that I use with contact cement and so on. Never tried it on the windows nut will soon, the Aeronca has some over spray.

            VM&P is Varnish Maker's & Painter's not sure how different that is from what you have Marty.

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            • #7
              David, sounds like the same stuff I use. There is another Naptha but it seems to have an oily film. The Naptha in the photos is the one I use and is the same as lighter fluid.
              Attached Files
              Cheers,
              Marty


              TF #596
              1946 BC-12D N95258
              Former owner of:
              1946 BC-12D/N95275
              1943 L-2B/N3113S

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              • #8
                Thanks to all of you. Clark
                Clark Freese
                1940 BL 65, Project

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                • #9
                  If its dope or a non urethane enamel mineral spirits or varsol might work, but laquer thinner is very risky. I have found Mothers magwheel polish works very well on plexiglass. It's less abrasive than compounds but cleans the surface very well
                  Scott
                  CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

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                  • #10
                    Any progress?
                    N29787
                    '41 BC12-65

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                    • #11
                      No progress yet. I tried a bit of thinner earlier today but that didn't really show any significant change, although it did seem to pick up some dirt. I've obtained some Naptha and it is picking it up a little bit. But as I've thought about the ideas offered and the fact that the paint has been on there almost 35 years I'm not expecting much out of the Naptha, but also think that as it soaks in a bit it might lift a little off at a time. I'm thinking the key is going to be patience and the use of the auto compound or magwheel polishers. I'll work on it more this evening.
                      Clark Freese
                      1940 BL 65, Project

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                      • #12
                        One other thought comes to mind Clark. When I remove scratches I use 400 grit wet paper to remove the scratch, then 1500 grit wet paper. From 1500 I go straight to the Mother's aluminium polish and that brings the surface back surprisingly well. If the overspray resists the compound or polish, wet sanding first with 1500 or even finer might be an option to speed things up a bit.
                        S
                        Scott
                        CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Scott, Not sure where things are just yet. Weather is going to be warm tonight and tomorrow so I might change my plan from working on windshield tonight to cleaning the wings leading edge out and spars. Have tentative plans for the IA to take an initial look see this month and the give me the good news, bad news about what I'm working with.
                          Clark Freese
                          1940 BL 65, Project

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                          • #14
                            If you choose to go the mechanical type of removal, Aircraft Spruce sells MicroMesh kits. I used one many many years ago with good success. Also maybe auto headlight restoration kits.??? I've used on a couple of cars and they looked good from the front looking into the light. Never removed and looked through to see if all scratches removed, or if swirl marks created.

                            Mike Wood
                            Montgomery, TX
                            '46 BC12D
                            N44085 #9885

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