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  • Taylorcraft and spins

    I am wanting to take some spin training (in another airplane) - but I was wondering if the Taylorcraft will allow spins. Any ideas?

    As always, thanks,
    Danny Holder

  • #2
    Re: Taylorcraft and spins

    I have spun my BC12D numerous times. Just make sure there is nothing in the baggage compartment. An aft C.G. makes recovery more difficult.
    Richard Pearson
    N43381
    Fort Worth, Texas

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    • #3
      Re: Taylorcraft and spins

      Not sure about the new Taylorcrafts but the old ones were certified as "Standard Normal" and spins were approved in that category (as well as a few other maneuvers that I think are now considered "acrobatic", anyone have a list?).
      We DO need to remember that these birds are getting old and a screwed up recovery from many maneuvers can put a lot of load on a plane. A SMOOTH AND PROPER recovery from a spin doesn't really put much load on a plane at all. As far as what the structure sees, it is just a smooth pull out from a dive.

      Hank

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      • #4
        Re: Taylorcraft and spins

        Thanks guys...

        Danny

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        • #5
          Re: Taylorcraft and spins

          Back in the '60s soon after I bought my BC12D in 1964, I taught myself spins and loops in it. Spins were easy and recovery was easy. My first loop, I did not dive quite fast enough and did not pull up quite quick enough and stalled upside down. All the dirt on the floor cam up (down) to meet me in the face, gas spewed out of the nose tank cap all over the windsield and finally the engine quit. I had read about avoiding negative gs in a strut braced high wing airplane so decide the best thing to do next was nothing. In a few seconds which seemed like hours, the nose fell through and soon the engine started and I gently recovered from the dive. I went on and did a couple more having learned to pull up a little harder and dive a little faster for entry.
          A while after that, my instructor taught me to barrel role it. It did it nice;y. The plane was only 18 years old at the time. Now they are almost 70 and I don't think I want to try them today. Of course I am older and wiser now, too.

          Larry Wheelock, N96179 project BC12D

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          • #6
            Re: Taylorcraft and spins

            I remember hearing about a fellow who lived in the mountains of Colorado flying a Taylorcraft. He had his own instrument approach
            whereby he would determine his exact (?) location by the mountain peaks sticking above the clouds, and would then spin directly down to his landing strip. He did this on a regular basis, according to the story. I don't think I will try that anytime soon, but apparently it worked for him. I don't know how he knew what the cloud base was.
            Charles

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            • #7
              Re: Taylorcraft and spins

              I remember hearing about a fellow who lived in the mountains of Colorado flying a Taylorcraft. He had his own instrument approach
              whereby he would determine his exact (?) location by the mountain peaks sticking above the clouds, and would then spin directly down to his landing strip. He did this on a regular basis, according to the story. I don't think I will try that anytime soon, but apparently it worked for him. I don't know how he knew what the cloud base was.
              Charles

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                Originally posted by lawheelock View Post
                Back in the '60s soon after I bought my BC12D in 1964, I taught myself spins and loops in it. Spins were easy and recovery was easy. My first loop, I did not dive quite fast enough and did not pull up quite quick enough and stalled upside down. All the dirt on the floor cam up (down) to meet me in the face, gas spewed out of the nose tank cap all over the windsield and finally the engine quit. I had read about avoiding negative gs in a strut braced high wing airplane so decide the best thing to do next was nothing. In a few seconds which seemed like hours, the nose fell through and soon the engine started and I gently recovered from the dive. I went on and did a couple more having learned to pull up a little harder and dive a little faster for entry.
                A while after that, my instructor taught me to barrel role it. It did it nice;y. The plane was only 18 years old at the time. Now they are almost 70 and I don't think I want to try them today. Of course I am older and wiser now, too.

                Larry Wheelock, N96179 project BC12D
                I need to make a correction. I failed to view the post before posting it. My instructor tried to show me how to barrel the Taylorcraft, but it did not work. He then showed me how to snap roll it. It did that nicely and almost as quickly as you can blink your eye. The snap roll is just a horizontal spin, started with an accelerated stall and full rudder. It snaps good and, done correctly does not pose high loads.

                Larry Wheelock, BC12D

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                • #9
                  Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                  It will barrel roll, even with the engine shut off. Loops deadstick too..... and spins fine-


                  -
                  Andrew King
                  Elkwood, VA
                  BC-65 NC23876
                  Bald Eagle Aviation

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                  • #10
                    Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                    Originally posted by lawheelock View Post
                    I need to make a correction. I failed to view the post before posting it. My instructor tried to show me how to barrel the Taylorcraft, but it did not work. He then showed me how to snap roll it. It did that nicely and almost as quickly as you can blink your eye. The snap roll is just a horizontal spin, started with an accelerated stall and full rudder. It snaps good and, done correctly does not pose high loads.

                    Larry Wheelock, BC12D
                    Except the gyroscopic loads on the engine mount?
                    Best Regards,
                    Mark Julicher

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                    • #11
                      Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                      Originally posted by Mark Julicher View Post
                      Except the gyroscopic loads on the engine mount?
                      And the twisting force on the tail.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                        Originally posted by Hank Jarrett View Post
                        Not sure about the new Taylorcrafts but the old ones were certified as "Standard Normal" and spins were approved in that category (as well as a few other maneuvers that I think are now considered "acrobatic", anyone have a list?).
                        We DO need to remember that these birds are getting old and a screwed up recovery from many maneuvers can put a lot of load on a plane. A SMOOTH AND PROPER recovery from a spin doesn't really put much load on a plane at all. As far as what the structure sees, it is just a smooth pull out from a dive.

                        Hank
                        I agree with Hank. I do a lot of loops, and Barrel Rolls, but I am VERY smooth. I had a friend who was a competition Aerobatic Glider Pilot, that kept trying to get me to tighten up my routine, so as to not use so much of the box. He would show me the G-meter telltales, and they would usually be around 1.5 positive, and 1.3 negative. That's just what "feels" good to me. I have done some spins in mine, but again, I am very gentile with the old girl.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Taylorcraft and spins

                          Along with the usual precautions and carburetor heat, my checklist for power off stalls and spins calls for practicing them over a good landing spot should the engine quit.

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