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  • Max Crosswind Spec

    Anyone know if there is a max crosswind limit written down somewhere? My flight instructor would like to know.
    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Max Crosswind Spec

    Originally posted by TorqueWrench74 View Post
    Anyone know if there is a max crosswind limit written down somewhere? My flight instructor would like to know.
    Thanks
    CAR-4 airplanes do not have the same requirements as the more modern FAR brethren. I know of no documented max crosswind limits. I may be wrong and would love to hear if anyone else knows of such.
    That being said, I would be interested in the personal limits used by all you guys.
    For my part, I have been flying my BC12-D long enough that I have landed in a STEADY direct 15 kt crosswind and use that as my personal limit. If I can keep the nose down the runway, the plane is perfectly capable of doing its part.

    (Now watch the spectacular ground loop the next time a light breeze crosses from the left...)
    Skip Egdorf
    TF #895
    BC12D N34237 sn7700

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    • #3
      Re: Max Crosswind Spec

      I'm not a Taylorcraft expert and this comment is only for discussion purposes. Given the concerns about the age of some aircraft and potential for internal corrosion within the landing gear's diagonal brace, I'd be careful about side loading the plane on paved surfaces. Gravel and grass are more accommodating and can offer side slippage in crosswinds.

      Inward side loading the landing gear and connecting strut that extends from the lower gear leg to the bungees will place compression loads on the strut tubing. Drop tests of landing gear at certification may not duplicate that load. Corrosion thins metal and reduces strength.

      Here's some crosswind opinions; 10 kt seems common. Later Taylorcrafts certified under Part 3 - TCDS 1A9 like the F-19 to F-22 may have better documentation. Like anything mechanical it's ok until it isn't.

      http://tcraftbowden.blogspot.com/200...n39911_13.html
      http://www.swaviator.com/html/issued00j01/tcart.html

      Edit: On page 206 of Chet Peek's Taylorcraft Story it lists for a 1980 Taylorcraft F-21 a maximum demonstrated crosswind component of 12 kt.

      Gary
      Last edited by PA1195; 06-20-2018, 01:47.
      N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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      • #4
        Re: Max Crosswind Spec

        I hear where your coming from, i have been flying this plane with my dad for many years. Only issue is he is not getting any younger and wants me to get off my a@* and get my PPL. My instructor has mostly flown 150 and 172 and they have POH's with all sorts of fancy information. I know that the plane does not have any POH only information is a few sheets of a Flight Manual from Taylorcraft dated 1974 with a few specs on Speeds which is good enough for me. I am very comfortable in crosswinds and freak out my instructor in a good sideslip. Just thought i would throw out the question and see if any exists.

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        • #5
          Re: Max Crosswind Spec

          It looks like 10-12 kt, with the 10 a suggestion and 12 having been demonstrated. Not sure what that means but it should be straightforward to pick your flying battles and days. Not all crosswinds are 90* across the landing surface so there is some geometry involved that reduces their value when they're diagonal and less than 90*.

          Tri-gear planes can be driven onto their landing. Conventional spring gear can give both in and out some. But any fixed strut like the Taylorcraft and Cubs doesn't yield much to inward side loads. I'd be sure the rubber cushion bumpers under the bungees are still intact and flexible and the diagonal strut (and gear in general) is inspected for integrity and corrosion. Have a look at that lower AN5 bolt on the strut to gear also.

          Gary
          N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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          • #6
            Re: Max Crosswind Spec

            My tcart is a BC-65, but a little bit of a special plane with a shorter wing and bigger engine but it seems to do fine with cross winds. Last week it was gusting 25 knots, not straight crosswind but pretty good at times and I was able to keep it on the runway. The only problem I had was after I stopped and tried to back taxi, the wind was so strong I had a hard time getting it turned around when the tail got close to 90' to the wind it would weather vane back around, the brakes just weren't strong enough. Which makes me think you can't do 20knt once you lose speed and the wind going over the vertical surfaces. One landing I crabbed it in and side loaded the landing gear and tires pretty good but never felt like it was going to come around on me, but then I had it straightened out before it slowed too much. I decided to put it away until the wind settled down.

            METAR KFOT 122340Z AUTO 30019G25KT 10SM CLR 17/12 A3002 RMK AO1=
            Last edited by SpecialT; 06-20-2018, 17:00.

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            • #7
              Re: Max Crosswind Spec

              Its not very much, especially with schinn brakes, MAYBE 15 kts. I have landed in much stronger crosswind, probably was around 30 kts, fully cross controlled and coulld not land on pavement, had to slide it in on the grass between taxiways. Never want to do that again. For the record, it was in our F21, and it had Cleavelands and horsepower to help keep me out of trouble.

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              • #8
                Re: Max Crosswind Spec

                I have landed 18-20 kts but I was not able to taxi...and it sucked on final...they had to send out a fuel truck to block the wind so I could taxi in. It was wild when the airplane weather vaned as soon as I began slowing down. I am glad the runway was wide enough. This was at Rapid City SD back in about 2002, I have a lot more experience now and I would just land on the taxi way now....instead of fighting that much cross wind component. Tim
                N29787
                '41 BC12-65

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                • #9
                  Re: Max Crosswind Spec

                  Originally posted by astjp2 View Post
                  I have landed 18-20 kts ...
                  So have I, but in to wind!

                  My own minima: If the wind is 5-10 knots across, land on the runway. If the wind is 15-20, then either find another runway or another airfield. Anything above 20, I go back to the original runway and do a 45! (or a 90, as has been known). Seriously, if the crosswind is so strong, get some lessons on how to mitigate the amount of crosswind component.

                  The 10-15 bracket is the questionable phase.

                  But as we know with low horsepower, low wing-loading taildraggers, landing is not the issue...it's taxying!

                  As an addition, I will say that the runway centreline depicts the centerline of the runway...it does NOT mean that you have to clatter your tailwheel along it.

                  (This post not aimed at Tim by any means )

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