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Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

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  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Originally posted by Mark Julicher View Post
    That is just preposterous! We thought you designed the Taube!
    Mark

    Had to find a new career after the Nina & Pinta Projects.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Julicher
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Originally posted by magman View Post

    Wanted to clarify that as many people think it was a Bleriot!
    That is just preposterous! We thought you designed the Taube!

    Leave a comment:


  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    I do go on several forums.

    Haven't found a 150 Forum yet.

    There is a group but I find that unwieldy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adamo13
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Completely agree with Hank and Dave. I will try to get this posted on a Cessna forum too. I'm very appreciative of all the help I've received here so far! Bought the 'nose-dragger' ironically to keep me in the air while I restore the Taylorcraft and for training purposes for my younger cousin learning to fly. Unsettling to not know 100% why an engine failed!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank Jarrett
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    ABSOLUTELY!!! Some of us tease about "Nose Draggers" but most of us also have flown them...or at least have friends who do. Great info that is ALWAYS welcome here.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • 3Dreaming
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Originally posted by Robert Lees View Post
    This IS in the "Hangar Mates" section, so it's perfectly alright. And there's nothing wrong with the C150 either...it does exactly what it was designed for!
    I don't think anyone is taking issue with it being here, but rather that it should be shared on a Cessna 150 forum too.

    Leave a comment:


  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    My thought is that ALL of us that have some knowledge that may reduce the chances of danger or injury to another have a RESPONSIBILITY to share that

    knowledge with other folks.

    If you have been in Aviation any length of time I'm sure you can share stories of needless tragedy.

    I do participate in other forums.

    Sometimes I learn; other times others do.

    That is the great thing about forums & Aviation people.

    fyi- The first aircraft I worked on when I received my A & P was a Taylorcraft.

    Wanted to clarify that as many people think it was a Bleriot!

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Lees
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    This IS in the "Hangar Mates" section, so it's perfectly alright. And there's nothing wrong with the C150 either...it does exactly what it was designed for!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank Jarrett
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Yea, the thread may not have been on Taylorcrafts, but I sure saw a lot of interesting things in it. Don't stop with the cross talk, but who knows how to get it to the 150 guys?

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • drude
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Hi all,

    I am not being a smart Alec (not sure why Alec got saddled with that term) nor am I chasing you away.

    This thread was interesting and I would think that there is a Cessna 150 forum somewhere that needs to see this stuff.

    Adamo13 you should check that out.

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    A common way for water to enter the tank is from the Wells around the Filler Caps.

    Water is held for extended periods & some wicks down the screws & enters the tank.

    Brings along some rust as well.

    EZ fix is to seal the top of the screw with something I discovered years ago.

    RTV was used to seal shrouds in the Afterburner area of fighter aircraft.

    Works fine here.

    Do NOT ignore this.

    1. The rust may cause the Drain Valve not to seal.

    2. The very fine rust CAN move through the Strainers & into the Carb.

    At that point the Carb fails to function.

    Not good on ground.

    Worse in Flight!

    Leave a comment:


  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Crazy Snow here in Buffalo area.

    Also crazy writing about a 150 on a Taylorcraft Forum.


    Oft overlooked is the BOTTOM Sump ; NOT the Firewall!

    Some have a Drain Valve added via STC.

    Most still have the AN Cap secured by a plate with a screw.

    Common to find water/trash there as it is the lowest point in the Fuel Sys.

    Ea as it is right below the Selector.sy to check

    Leave a comment:


  • magman
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    When I've encountered this it was like this.

    Carb Heat Oper. was normal @ typical 1700 RPM check on ground.

    However; in flight as when pulling heat ON while on downwind the RPM would drop a LOT & IMMEDIATELY.

    Likely the water that was trapped moved due to a higher volume of air in the duct.

    Higher Engine RPM & Airspeed would be the reason.

    The water would then splash on the hot muffler.

    The resultant STEAM in then ingested into the Carb.

    Throws the Combustion Process out of wack.


    A small hole between the wires is all you need.

    I usually use a #40 ( 3/32) as that is handy for me.

    Easy to pour water in & OP. Ck.

    All you need is a little drip.


    Since you are replacing the SCAT:

    1. Assure that the wire end and the string are captured by the clamp.

    2. Use RTV ( Room Temp Vulcanizing aka Silicone) & run a bead lengthwise to

    secure the string.

    If the string moves the duct WILL collapse.

    It will help the SCAT last much longer.


    Note that when I inspect 150's it is VERY common to find FOD

    in the Intake Duct Loop.

    Very accessible for birds provides straw & stones.

    Also it is TOOO handy when folks are working in the area

    so that screws placed nearby wind up in the duct.

    Per FAR there should not be a screen over the Inlet as

    it could easily become obstructed.

    A plug tied to the Cowl Plugs or Prop would be good.

    The problem does NOT originate in Flight.

    Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Adamo13
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Here are some pictures to go with the book! One thing I found very interesting is the sump plug in the picture is only about a month old! How could so much residue form while it's soaking in 100LL in such a short time!? The rust debris was all removed from inside the tanks and most likely got there from being knocked off the inside of the filler neck while being refueled.

    Adam McPeck
    1950 Taylorcraft BC12-D N6627N
    1959 Cessna 150 N7950E
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Adamo13
    replied
    Re: Engine failure in flight in a Cessna 150

    Update: As you predicted magman... the wire in the SCAT ducting at the bottom of the U in the carb heat run was rusted and no longer holding shape. From the exterior it looked normal but when pinched It would completely collapse in that 3" area. I also found that the same SCAT run was wire tied in such a way that the ducting was reduced in size to approximately 3/4" to an 1" . Could it be possible that the carb was not getting full heat with the hose bottled up? The carb heat checked out fine on the run up that day with proper RPM drop. Do you think this had anything to do with the engine failure that day? As far as the fix goes, do I just drill a small hole right in the new ducting itself between the embedded wire? And roughly how small would you recommend? Thanks for the heads up on this deal! I really appreciate it. Could have caused some real problems if left unnoticed.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

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