Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TQ Avionics

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TQ Avionics

    I see there is some talk about TQ in the recent ADS-B thread. I thought I'd start a thread about them. Like Drude, I also talked to them at SnF (wish I'd known you were there!) They are a German group that caters to glider folks - so they specialize in compact stuff with low power consumption. I believe they used to be Dittel - or purchased Dittel. They have a small transponder and ADS-B solution. I didn't get too much info on that because currently my plan is to be battery-only and avoid the requirement for a transponder and ADS-B. I'm based at an airpark that's under the Memphis Class B - but it's really not that busy here other than FedEx's pushes. I have ADS-B out and in for my Bonanza. It's really nice, but I think a portable ADS-B in will satisfy me on the Tcraft. We'll see.

    Of more interest to me was their small com radio the KRT2 that includes a built-in intercom. It was $1040 at the show. I'm trying to decide which radio I'd like. I have a neighbor who had an MGL v6 that he liked a lot. Trig makes the TY91. Looks nice, but it's a separate control head and box, so more wiring work. I haven't heard a lot of good things about the Micro-Air.

    Any of you have experience with these comms? What about TQ/Dittel? Also feel free to discuss their transponder and ADS-B stuff in this thread.
    Brian Cantrell
    1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96262
    1961 N35 Bonanza, N61GM

  • #2
    After talking to many manufacturers about comms and transponders, I went with trig. the primary reason was that the factory reps were actually able and willing to answer my questions and take the time to discuss install, rack and wiring diagrams etc.

    The transponder gets its air/ground info from the waas gps data so there is no need for a squat switch for adsb. Both the comm and transponder are very low power consumption and continue operating down to about 9v so lots of time available from my $50 lipoly battery.

    for the Taylorcraft I went with the ty91 and tt21 (note; TT21 and 22 have built-in encoders). Yes there is more hookups involved but The install manual/wiring diagrams are good and of course you have the option of remotely mounting the trancievers.

    for my 172 I installed the tt31 which is a slide-in replacement for the kt76a (kt76 & kt78). Adding a single wire data feed from a waas gps completes the adsb install. No rack change, no squat or airspeed switch, about 30 minutes to run through the setup menus and done.

    make sure you specify you need the most recent software updates when you order.

    Trig also make the Kings kt74.

    I think it's rare for an aviation supplier to actually make things easy, and provide the level of direct to owner support I've experienced, but I don't have as much experience with the other manufacturers you mentioned.

    my tcraft radio install is here:
    http://c-fclr.blogspot.com/p/map.html

    I should also mention that I charge the lithium battery with a 10W solar panel, in the air this slows the discharge rate when I'm using the comm, transponder and ipad. On the ground it brings the lithium, ipad and cellphone back to full charge.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN7258.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	125.6 KB
ID:	182287
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Scott; 1 week ago.
    Scott
    CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

    Comment


    • #3
      When I put in the new ELT (406 Mhz?) I found it annoying to do the install. I really wanted to get one of those old EBT units that just mounts on the interior with no electrical hookups, all self contained, antenna pos up in a crash....

      It's not difficult to do a "normal" ELT install I just don't enjoy so I avoid things like that. That could make me lazy or a narcissist or both I guess.

      But when I saw the skyBeacon and the ease of it's install I went for that one.

      I had originally been looking at the tt22 and when I saw the tkx2 for $600 less and simpler install (not that tt22 was difficult, it is not) the TQ tkx2 appealed to my lazy side.

      Probably I have not selected the lowest cost system. But that was never my goal. I am not required to ads-b out or xponder. I just want to be seen (is that narcissistic too?).

      I want to be seen and spend the least time and effort doing an install.

      I like the solar cell idea and may copy that one, thanks Scott.

      Currently I have an 11 lbs. Odyssey 15 aH battery for the starter, it also powers ADS-b and will power xponder.

      I am thinking of swapping it out for a 7aH that weighs 5.5 lbs so the panel can be real plus.

      Dave
      Last edited by drude; 1 week ago.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hank asked me about the solar setup.
        I was actually looking for a thin flexible panel, but then this Coleman one went on special for $28 (US$20), and I was short of time so I tried it. It's rated 10 watts. I put some velcro on it and it fits between the compass and fuselage tubes.

        The Lithium battery I got from amazon; name is Talentcell and rated 11000ahr at 12V. I'm cautious about lithium batteries but this one reportedly has Panasonic cells in it (I have not dismantled it to confirm). It has a USB power output as well for charging ipad cellphone etc.

        The Battery manufacturer does NOT recommend charging with a solar panel. Having said that DC voltage is DC voltage regardless of the source and photo voltaic cells produce clean current. So I experimented a little.

        I have the panel connected directly to the battery pack (no charge controller note: the panel has an internal diode).

        In the air, with radios on and ipad connected, the solar panel raises the voltage a little, but the battery continues to discharge. This means the output from the solar panel is simply supplementing the battery output extending the discharge time. Importantly there is no charging so no potential for over charging, overheating or over anything (most, but no all of the risks with lithium batteries are associated with physical damage to one or more cells and over-temp due to high charge or discharge rates). The solar panel effectively reduces the discharge rate therefore reducing discharge risk. Air time from YQT to OSH was 4:20 and lots of life left in both the battery and ipad. (on the bench this battery powered the Transponder and VHF in receive mode for 24hrs)

        On the ground, with the solar panel connected to the battery and nothing else, even in bright sunlight, the voltage remains under the max voltage measured during charge from the wall charger. It takes a few hours but does bring the battery to full charge. I monitored it at OSH for a week and even with both the battery and panel in bright sunlight no significant temperature rise was detected. In practice I place the battery under the panel (a good distance away from anything flammable).

        So I would class this as experimental, but it does make for a light and effective package.

        Difficult to see in the photo but I attached an angle to the hinge screws. The radio package goes in over, and drops behind, the angle, then the battery slides in on top "wedging" it all in place. I usually have the door on so all but the solar panel is out of sight.

        This is a "portable" solution if anyone's wondering about certification

        Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN685850.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	98.5 KB
ID:	182295
        Scott
        CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

        Comment


        • #5
          Lots of great info guys. Thanks!!

          Scott do you have a starter in your Taylorcraft? I will, and I'll use the Odyssey PC680 to power it. I've been debating powering everything with the Odyssey, or using a portable battery like yours to power my portable GPS (Garmin Aera 660) and ADS-B in (either GDL-50 or -52, haven't purchased yet). They will both run on USB power. I have a 26800 mah battery by Anker with 3 usb outlets that I also bought from Amazon. I was thinking maybe that would save the ship's battery just for starts and the radio.

          Didn't really think about getting a 12V capable li-poly that could also run the radio, but now you've intrigued me. Oshkosh and SnF are both gonna be about 9-10 hours of flying in the Taylorcraft - so quite a few starts and radio/accessory usage. I've done it in a Cub, and it's a LONG ride! Obviously, those long flights won't be the norm in T-craft, and the Odyssey alone would be just fine for local pleasure flying use.
          Brian Cantrell
          1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96262
          1961 N35 Bonanza, N61GM

          Comment


          • #6
            Brian,
            Check out the Odyssey PC545 (11 lbs & 15aH) and the PC310 (6 lbs & 7 aH) for your starter.
            The PC545 cranks my C90 quite easily, the PC310 will probably do the same, plan to try that soon. Both are lighter than the PC680.
            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              Look at my 337 for a battery box on the firewall. https://www.taylorcraft.org/docs/Bat...urls%20PMA.pdf
              https://www.taylorcraft.org/docs/odyssey%20battery1.pdf
              https://www.taylorcraft.org/docs/odyssey%20battery2.pdf
              N29787
              '41 BC12-65

              Comment


              • #8
                Armstrong starter only on CF-CLR
                Scott
                CF-CLR Blog: http://c-fclr.blogspot.ca/

                Comment


                • #9
                  EarthX is like 4 pounds...
                  N29787
                  '41 BC12-65

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X