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Scott Master Cylinder Attachment BC12D

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  • Scott Master Cylinder Attachment BC12D

    Installing disc brakes on N96323 and have decided to go with the Scott Master Cylinders. I have searched the forum and found a lot of information including the many photos and 337 information. I have not found a sketch or photo that adequately showed the attachment to the structure under the floor. Appreciate any guidance offered.

    bob price

  • #2
    https://vb.taylorcraft.org/forum/tay...es-for-N96872=

    Mounted to metal plate over wood floor. Ties it into the mounts of the wood.

    Gary
    N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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    • #3
      Unless you are using cub/pacer brakes, those masters suck for anything with disc's, as in dont work in stock form. Look at a pull master cylinder and you can use the heel brake pedals with a cable attached to the master.
      N29787
      '41 BC12-65

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      • #4
        Scott brake boosters. Put some lead in your pencil. Or just use the Grove pull cylinders off the existing pedals or via cable like above:

        https://www.airframesalaska.com/Brak...ble-p/8400.htm
        https://www.airframesalaska.com/v/vs...stallation.pdf

        Gary
        N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PA1195 View Post
          Scott brake boosters. Put some lead in your pencil. Or just use the Grove pull cylinders off the existing pedals or via cable like above:

          https://www.airframesalaska.com/Brak...ble-p/8400.htm
          https://www.airframesalaska.com/v/vs...stallation.pdf

          Gary
          Those Scott's just suck, they are trying to be something that Cleveland, Matco and Grove did out of the box...
          N29787
          '41 BC12-65

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank all of you for your response. As I am about to install the Scott Master Cylinders that I purchased recently and which my DER has approved for review by our local FSDO I am concerned that they are not the best choice. But with that being said I recall there are a lot of TCraft owners that used the Scotts an found them effective. I would deeply appreciate feedback from those who have the Scotts with their disc brake conversion.

            Respectively,
            bob

            Comment


            • #7
              Dr. Tim's grumpy today. We all get that way but he's right about higher pressure setups available.

              I've had Scott masters on three Cub planes and the only issue was low performance when the diaphragms aged and stretched. If pulled towards the pilot then topped off twith no bubbles in the fluid they did their best which was ok.

              One of the three Cubs had Cleveland disc brakes and due to overpressure from a mechanic locked one brake when it got hot from a rear seat heater tube. Cost me a prop. So they can under atypical circumstances overpressure a disc brake. But otherwise they would slow the plane and hold it under static rpm but not always under full throttle especially when wet. Turning with brake worked. I guess if ok but not excellent performance is good then try them. Taylorcrafts are light and a tip over is undesirable.

              I have the Grove setup on my Taylorcraft and it will stop and hold 26" Airstreaks maybe too much so I'm careful.

              Gary
              N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PA1195 View Post
                Dr. Tim's grumpy today. We all get that way but he's right about higher pressure setups available.

                I've had Scott masters on three Cub planes and the only issue was low performance when the diaphragms aged and stretched. If pulled towards the pilot then topped off twith no bubbles in the fluid they did their best which was ok.

                One of the three Cubs had Cleveland disc brakes and due to overpressure from a mechanic locked one brake when it got hot from a rear seat heater tube. Cost me a prop. So they can under atypical circumstances overpressure a disc brake. But otherwise they would slow the plane and hold it under static rpm but not always under full throttle especially when wet. Turning with brake worked. I guess if ok but not excellent performance is good then try them. Taylorcrafts are light and a tip over is undesirable.

                I have the Grove setup on my Taylorcraft and it will stop and hold 26" Airstreaks maybe too much so I'm careful.

                Gary
                Gary, they were good in 1940, but 1970's clevelands are so much more consistant, 1990's grove and 2000's for matco's...I put clevelands on my airplane and I also put on toe brakes. I spoiled myself and now I will NEVER GO BACK... and you CANT MAKE ME! har har har!
                N29787
                '41 BC12-65

                Comment


                • #9
                  We flew skis and floats for many years without brakes. Then someone invented a hydraulic spike brake for skis and then everyone had to have them to stop (https://www.airframesalaska.com/Griz...rag-s/1879.htm), especially those that had hit others and paid far more for the subsequent repairs. I kept a deployable anchor and rope in the left float compartment of a C-185 in case I had to stop or at least slow before damage.

                  So given that any brake on wheels is pretty good but yes some are better.

                  Gary
                  N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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