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  • oilite bearing info

    https://pdf4pro.com/cdn/oilite-bearing-62968.pdf

    Info on oilite bearings
    Attached Files
    N29787
    '41 BC12-65

  • #2
    Thanks Dr. Tim I wondered how they worked. I assumed they needed lube from some external source, but there they describe being pressure lubed during production with turbine oil (synthetic; ~30W) and PTFE (teflon) or MoS2 (moly) adds to improve.

    Gary
    N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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    • #3
      If you really want them lubed, throw them in a jar of oil and place a vacuum pump on it. The oxygen will bubble out and you'll be amazed how much oil they consume!
      John
      I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

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      • #4
        Or heat them in oil (90 degrees C or about 190F) and whilst still submerged, allow to cool to room temperature before removing from the oil.

        Phosphor bronze is of course better, but certified is certified, eh?

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        • #5
          Question: When replacing control surface bushings are they pre-oiled or just plain brass? I've replaced them on a few Cubs but not yet on my Taylorcraft. Usually just a drop of 20W non-detergent electric motor oil once in a while. Some like graphite or moly in the oil.

          Gary
          N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

          Comment


          • #6
            I always made my own so they were Oilite, Gary. I don't know what "real" parts are!
            John
            I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

            Comment


            • #7
              "real": https://www.univair.com/taylorcraft/...leron-bushing/

              Click image for larger version

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              N36007 1941 BF12-65 STC'd as BC12D-4-85

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              • #8
                Originally posted by N96337 View Post
                I always made my own so they were Oilite, Gary. I don't know what "real" parts are!
                John
                I don't understand how you could make your own, John (unless you sinter them yourself in a mould?). Oilite is a sintered product, and machining them will seal the pores that give the material its oil-retaining abilities, surely? But I'm willing to be edumicated!
                Rob

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                • #9
                  We've always machined it. Never had an issue.
                  John
                  I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    factory said to press fit in, ream ID to final size
                    N29787
                    '41 BC12-65

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