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Paperwork/337 timing question

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  • Paperwork/337 timing question

    I'm restoring my Taylorcraft a bit piecemeal. About to put fabric on the wings. Hope to finish that and fly it for a summer or two before tackling the fuselage. My IA and I have been discussing paperwork timing, so I thought I'd ask you guys for your opinion. The Air Tech process manual (and other manuals I've read) recommend having the same IA that will sign off the aircraft when finished do a "ready for fabric" inspection. My IA has inspected the wings and is satisfied. Does this go in the logs now? Or just at the end. And a related question: I've completely disassembled the wings, built new spars, replaced LE skins, cleaned and primed all the metal, etc. Do we need two separate 337s? One now documenting the repairs and one later documenting the fabric work per STC? My IA is leaning towards one big 337and log entry at completion of the wings. One advantage I see to doing separate 337s would be if something happened to me or my IA before the project was finished, the next guy would have good documentation without having to rip the new fabric off for inspection. I don't think that's too likely though. Hope to have the wings finished and on by this summer.
    Brian Cantrell
    1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96262
    1961 N35 Bonanza, N61GM

  • #2
    Originally posted by cbcfly View Post
    One advantage I see to doing separate 337s would be if something happened to me or my IA before the project was finished, the next guy would have good documentation without having to rip the new fabric off for inspection. I don't think that's too likely though. Hope to have the wings finished and on by this summer.
    That would be the only real advantage I can see. I'd rather just do the one 337 and entry.
    John

    I'm so far behind, I think I'm ahead

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    • #3
      I'll add one more advantage, your IA will get more 337's for his renewal. Sometimes that helps. :-)

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      • #4
        Thanks fellas.
        Brian Cantrell
        1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96262
        1961 N35 Bonanza, N61GM

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        • #5
          I just used to put it in the log book as a precover inspection and list any repairs not requiring a 337, then the final IA would note the log book entry as being completed by the other IA...If your IA dies or moves on, you will be looking at having the documentation for the precover. Tim

          By the way, spar replacement and rib repair is a major, requiring a 337, but rib replacement and leading edge replacement is not...
          Last edited by astjp2; 04-13-2019, 20:03.
          N29787
          '41 BC12-65

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          • #6
            Depends on the spar, if you purchase a PMA replacement or make (manufacture) one or if replacement involves riveting or welding.

            (b) Major repairs(1) Airframe major repairs. Repairs to the following parts of an airframe and repairs of the following types, involving the strengthening, reinforcing, splicing, and manufacturing of primary structural members or their replacement, when replacement is by fabrication such as riveting or welding, are airframe major repairs.

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