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High performance piston options for the O-200

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  • astjp2
    started a topic High performance piston options for the O-200

    High performance piston options for the O-200

    ok, been digging and found the piston pin height for the different piston that could be used to up the compression in an O-200
    stock.......1.591-1.596.....7.0-1 compression
    GO-300...1.611-1.616......7.3-1 compression
    C-85.......1.698-1.708......????
    O-200D...1.745-1.750......8.5-1 compression
    So if you want to up your compression, the O-200D will provide the highest compression and is a factory item...I just wish I had some pics of each piston to compare....

    Ok, so the Performance Aero pistion is 1.870 ....... 9.0-1 compression
    Last edited by astjp2; 02-28-2018, 01:04.

  • JimC
    replied
    "The 3pt. pos or neg acceleration data generated depends on the orientation of the I-Phone relative to the direction of travel:"

    Yes, on all three axes.

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  • PA1195
    replied
    Originally posted by JimC View Post
    "and see what it captures"

    That would be great.
    I tried it in my car today. The 3pt. pos or neg acceleration data generated depends on the orientation of the I-Phone relative to the direction of travel:

    https://developer.apple.com/document...rometer_events

    Sampling frequency or refresh rate is variable from 1-30 Hz to allow for a choice of smoothing or fine data capture. Min and Max G is logged and the data is exportable.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/acce...499629589?mt=8

    Gary

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  • JimC
    replied
    "and see what it captures"

    That would be great.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA1195
    replied
    Originally posted by JimC View Post
    Higher MP is better.
    What engine do those 8.5 pistons usually go in? (the reason for my rod length question)
    There are several apps the dragstrip guys use that would work for us.
    Jim I posted under the current Catto thread on SC.org some reference to our conversations above and wondered aloud about using the acceleration output you suggested to examine power and performance. If interested have a look at Catto update.and??. There seems to be convincing butt fed data that promotes that product over Borer props and others. Maybe it's time for a real test. It's above my pay grade but I can run the wife's I-Phone next time I fly and see what it captures.

    Gary

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  • JimC
    replied
    Higher MP is better.
    What engine do those 8.5 pistons usually go in? (the reason for my rod length question)
    There are several apps the dragstrip guys use that would work for us.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA1195
    replied
    I think plumbing a manifold pressure gauge into the induction should reflect incremental improvements. The closer the WFO value is to the reading prior to start the lower the induction system loss. Not sure where to plumb. Mine is at the induction spider but cylinders typically have a tap over the intake port.

    Continental offers a range of expected values at full throttle in their Testing After Overhaul section late in the O/H Manual. I assume a lower vacuum/higher manifold pressure reading is better.

    Gary

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  • astjp2
    replied
    Originally posted by JimC View Post
    I haven't looked at the 8.5 piston. Rod length?
    In the visual description below, pretend the cylinders are vertical.
    The C85 piston is tall enough that the top perimeter has to be chamfered to clear the head. That would seem to be about as tall as you can make a flat top piston. And on some assemblies, others have reported that the bottom of the top ring can get high enough to hang on the top of the steel cylinder barrel. I hear it is a bit of a struggle to get everything back apart when that happens (I've.not confirmed this for myself).
    Rod length is the same for all of the engines that we deal with. I would love to get some measurements on the Lycon pistons along with some weights.

    Also a real dynometer would really give true numbers, but most of us cannot afford to start doing mods, run on a dyno then do some more and get more numbers. I would be happy with flow numbers on carbs and intake configurations with some porting, polishing, and gasket matching mixed in.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA1195
    replied
    Briefly my wife consented to download an acceleration app from Apple to her I-Phone. Three axis X-Y-Z planes with + and - G values ref to phone position. Start run and stop run plots a stream of 3-axis data. Others offer plotting software to export and plot the results. Will cost me a dinner for two her choice.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/acce...499629589?mt=8

    JimC have you experimented with this tech? It's like ...why is this news? I would have thought the builders and modders would have figured a way to apply this to their alterations by now and discussed it.

    Gary
    Last edited by PA1195; 03-13-2019, 21:53.

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  • JimC
    replied
    I haven't looked at the 8.5 piston. Rod length?
    In the visual description below, pretend the cylinders are vertical.
    The C85 piston is tall enough that the top perimeter has to be chamfered to clear the head. That would seem to be about as tall as you can make a flat top piston. And on some assemblies, others have reported that the bottom of the top ring can get high enough to hang on the top of the steel cylinder barrel. I hear it is a bit of a struggle to get everything back apart when that happens (I've.not confirmed this for myself).
    Last edited by JimC; 03-13-2019, 21:16.

    Leave a comment:


  • astjp2
    replied
    Originally posted by JimC View Post

    C85 pistons in an 85 Stroker, C90, or O-200 give 8.68:1 compression ratio.
    .
    Jim, considering the 8.5 to 1 piston has a taller deck height, how can a shorter c-85 piston give more compression? Tim
    C-85.......1.698-1.708......????
    O-200D...1.745-1.750......8.5-1 compression
    Performance Aero pistion is 1.870 ....... 9.0-1 compression
    Last edited by astjp2; 03-13-2019, 19:19.

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  • PA1195
    replied
    Thanks Jim for the tip. I had heard from a friend that likes hot road rigs he had some way of measuring the power changes in his coal burning diesel truck. Maybe that's what.

    Have you tried that app yet? Might be a good topic for the curious and power modders that fly.

    I don't do personal assistants but my wife has several. It sounds like feeding time at the zoo who they all light off with calls and text messages.

    Gary

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  • JimC
    replied
    "Doing a static pull at 0 forward speed is a crude way to determine performance "

    Indeed so, but it is about the only practical way to get an approximate comparison.
    BTW, if you have an android phone, there are apps that will record your acceleration variation with time.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA1195
    replied
    The critical point for me about power and props is on floats when going from a step-plow to planing and then accelerating to takeoff speed. There's lots of water drag to overcome unlike on wheels. I'd have to guess that's 15-40 mph but so far never tried a GPS to pin that down better. It would take an onboard camera looking at or integrating the GPS' speed/time readout and plane's attitude out the windshield.

    Taxiing slightly nose up, then the bow rise to plowing under power followed by nose down as the floats climb up to a planing attitude just like a boat. Light that's a quick event but heavy it can take several long seconds if it ever happens. Sometimes weight reduction is the only way to get on step.

    On skis takeoff distance can be measured via tracks in the snow. That would be another way to compare propeller and power performance especially if the snow were deep.

    With the right diameter and pitch the "air traction" can be felt especially with puny power from these small Continentals. The plane suddenly accelerates at some forward speed after power application. When that surge happens during takeoff can be adjusted via propeller pitch at a fixed prop diameter, and probably between propellers of the same diameter and pitch configuration between manufacturers (the prop's airfoils, shape, and chord vary).

    Doing a static pull at 0 forward speed is a crude way to determine performance with my high drag criteria.

    Gary

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  • JimC
    replied
    I've tried Total Seal rings in a 9.5:1 O-200.
    It was a no-go. They sucked too much oil in through the valve guides, and I was never able to seal the guides well enough to stop it. Gave a puff of blue smoke every time you cobbed the throttle, and fouled the plugs in short order.

    If I remember correctly, Performance Engines has roller rockers available for the O-200, and is working on titanium rods.

    As an aside, Continental's published lift of 0.382" for the C85 and 0.410" for the C90 and O-200 is wrong.

    The 1.2 rocker ratio can be adjusted by using offset rocker bushings.

    C85 pistons in an 85 Stroker, C90, or O-200 give 8.68:1 compression ratio.

    "Every little bit helps".
    Gary, you got that right.

    My 9.5 O-200 with Brackett filter, stock J3 exhaust, and McCauley 1B90 CM 7142 statics about 2525-2550 rpm.
    With a 7441, about 25 rpm more (maybe 50, if you twitch your nose just right :-)
    From memory, about 2650 with a 7535.
    On a J3 landplane in WOT level flight, most I've turned it with the 7142 is 2950 rpm (118mph). With a 7535, 3150 rpm (115 mph).
    Last edited by JimC; 03-13-2019, 08:54.

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